Cellular Neurochemistry

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The nervous system is made up of different cell populations. These diverse cells interact to create a functioning brain. Understanding this cellular diversity and how they relate to each other is one of the major challenges of modern neuroscience.  The biochemical and molecular specialization of the nervous cells defines function at different developmental stages. In other words, the micro-anatomy of the brain provides the basis for its biochemical and molecular properties, which can vary depending on the age of the child. In this section you will find information about the major components of the nervous system and how they change during neurodevelopment and in relation with different neuropaediatric disorders.

-Neurons

-Glia

-Blood-brain barriers

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23 posts published about Cellular neurochemistry

Interneuronas, GABA y enfermedades neuropediátricas

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What do you know about interneurons? Which processes do you think they regulate? How could dysfunction in interneurons and abnormal gabaergic transmission contribute to the pathophysiology of some neuropaediatric disorders? Interneurons were classically described as short-axon neurons with connections between “input” and “output” principal cells and were recognized for their role in modulating excitability via […]

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Cholinergic neurotransmission and the developing brain

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What do you know about acetylcholine?  What about its role in the developing brain?   Are there diseases of the central nervous system due to abnormal cholinergic transmission in paediatrics? Our current knowledge about disorders of neurotransmission in children is focused on transmitters such as dopamine, serotonin or GABA. By contrast little is known about the […]

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Serotonin and cortical architecture

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The neurotransmitters sculpt the brain Serotonin is an abundant neurotransmitter in the brain. During development, serotonin regulates processes such as neuronal migration and dendrite differentiation through some particular 5HT receptors. Abnormal serotoninergic neurotransmission during early periods of life may disrupt the construction of  cortical circuits and contribute to neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.   The human […]

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