62 posts found

Modulation of inhibitory networks by gephyrin

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The glycinergic and the GABAergic neurotransmission are essential inhibitory networks. Glycinergic synapses are mostly present in the spinal cord, brainstem and retina, while GABAergic synapses are preponderant in the fore-brain. Anyway, both types of receptors are often together at post-synaptic regions, thus regulating the neurotransmission at the same time but with different action mechanisms. GABAA […]

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New applications of neuronal 3D cultures help to understand their metabolism

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Scientists have the need to develop and choose the best biological models to understand the basis of the diseases in preclinical studies. Currently, animals and monolayer cell cultures (2D cultures) are widely spread as reference models. Anyway, these models are not completely reliable when it is necessary to comprehend some key events of the development […]

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Does a relation exist between brain GABA levels and psychiatric disorders?

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Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in many physiological processes of brain. It is present in one third of synapses in the central nervous system, and modulates neurotransmission via GABAergic interneurons. Although the involvement of GABA in psychiatric disorders is well-known, understanding its role in their etiology is very difficult. In order to achieve […]

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DHA: a key omega-3 fatty acid in children brain development

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Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a long-chain omega-3 fatty acid naturally present in cold water fatty fish, and in maternal breast milk. DHA is also available in fish oil, in algal supplements, and in fortified milk and eggs. Although DHA can be synthesized from short-chain precursor a-linolenic acid, diet-assumed DHA accumulates more efficiently in erythrocytes, breast […]

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Rett syndrome: loss of balance between excitation and inhibition

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Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disease. Mutations in MECP2 (located on the X chromosome) are the most common cause. However, mutations in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 have been reported to produce a Rett-like phenotype. How these different genetic defects determine similar clinical features has yet to be elucidated. Italian researchers […]

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