5 posts found

Anti-inflammatory drugs can reverse synaptic defects

Inflammation modifies risk and/or severity of a variety of brain diseases through still elusive molecular mechanisms. Tomasoni et al. (open access article available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5370184/) show that hyperactivation of the interleukin 1 pathway, through either removal of the interleukin 1 receptor 8 (IL-1R8,) or activation of IL-1R, leads to up-regulation of the mTOR pathway and […]

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Central Serotonin Receptor 7 constitutes a potential therapeutic target for Rett Syndrome

Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopment disorder affecting around 1 out of 10,000 girls, usually due to de novo mutations in the X-located gene MECP2. It is a complex disorder, both clinically and at a molecular level, and is typically characterized by a neurodevelopment regression starting at age 6 to 18 months after a normal early […]

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The MECP2 gene and its role in the Rett syndrome

The Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurological disorder caused by mutations which occur in the gene MECP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein 2). This gene is located on the X chromosome, and the RTT affects only females – 1 every 10,000 – because the mutation of MECP2 in males is not viable. However, some isolated cases of boys […]

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Abnormal Gabaergic transmission in Rett syndrome

Neurons may remain immature concerning GABAergic neurotransmission in Rett syndrome Abnormal expression of cation chloride cotransporters has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Rett syndrome (RTT). This finding suggest an abnormal GABaergic transmission and neuronal maturation.  According to these results, neurons of RTT patients could remain “immature” regarding GABA excitability, as it […]

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